Let’s stay tuned!

HackelBury Fine Art, London is pleased to present: Elemental Forms, Landscape, a solo exhibition of new work by Nadezda Nikolova-Kratzer

Nadezda Nikolova Kratzer – Elemental Forms, Landscape
9th September – 30th October 2021

Nadezda Nikolova Kratzer, Elemental Forms, Landscape no. 30, 2018

HackelBury Fine Art, London is pleased to present: Elemental Forms, Landscape, a solo exhibition of new work by Nadezda Nikolova-Kratzer in which her love of nature and concern for the environment is reflected in her abstract landscapes which capture “the still point of the turning world”. (T.S. Eliot ‘Four Quartets’). Nikolova-Kratzer chooses a balancing act in her work between control and surrender, simplicity and intricacy, light and darkness. She uses simple shapes to create her photogram silhouettes, yet she works with a complex set of variables including temperature, humidity and the timing of the exposure – factors that fundamentally affect the outcome. Nikolova-Kratzer embraces this as she feels strongly that “it is this artifact of chance that brings meaning and excitement to life.”Her work becomes a metaphor for having
the fearlessness to embrace the unknown.

Drawing on poetry, literature and a myriad of artistic influences including Japanese Notan design, Matisse paper-cuts and the organic landscapes of Georgia O’Keefe, Nikolova-Kratzer creates photographic compositions which become sculptural in their focus on the object yet have the depth and thought of a painting. Using geometrical shapes and floating planes, these works build on her preceding series of landscapes taking them to a higher level of abstraction. With the materiality of the photographic medium, she seeks to record intangible aspects of the landscape, as she experiences them, through immersion and observation, without the camera’s capacity for transcription.

Her practice is inextricably linked to her way of life. The physical process of creating work uses her daily ritual of walking in the redwood forests near her home in Oakland, California to connect with nature and respond intuitively whilst reflecting her belief in the concept of immanence.

About Nadezda Nikolova-Kratzer

Nadezda Nikolova-Kratzer (b. 1978, former Yugoslavia) is an artist working with wet plate collodion photograms – a historical technique dating back to the 1850s which uses light-sensitive salts to cover a glass plate before exposing it to the light in a portable darkroom. Her practice is informed by an experimental approach to early photographic processes and her interest in the image as an object. Captivated by the fluidity of wet plate collodion, she manipulates the medium while simultaneously courting chance intrinsic to handmade photography: “I spray, dab and brush on the chemistry in a performative enactment rather than an image capture. (Sometimes, the brush strokes leave physical marks on the emulsion.) In essence, I am negotiating with the chemistry, guiding it. But only to a point. The chemistry has a say in the final image.” Nadezda Nikolova-Kratzer.

The abstract landscape series, Elemental Forms, Landscapes and Elemental Forms, Landscape Rearticulated, emerged as the artist’s direct response to her surroundings and to feeling a sense of wellbeing and security within the landscape. She believes that each locale has its specific identity, history,
and emotional imprint. Nadezda Nikolova-Kratzer has a degree in conservation and environmental sciences and a Master’s in Public Policy. She went on to study photography and historic processes at George Eastman Museum with
Mark Osterman and at the University of Kentucky. She was a finalist for the 2018 LensCulture Exposure Awards. She lives and works in Oakland, California.

About HackelBury Fine Art

Founded by Sascha Hackel and Marcus Bury, HackelBury Fine Art deals in 20th and 21st century artworks. Established in 1998, the London gallery in Launceston Place is committed to nurturing long-term relationships with both artists and clients. It continues to evolve and progress through an expanding
program of gallery exhibitions, museum projects and publishing ventures.
The small group of artists with whom HackelBury work, represent a diversity of practice, pushing the boundaries of various media. The work and practice of these artists encompasses the worlds of photography, painting, drawing, sculpture, architecture and performance. Each artist, whether emerging or established, creates work defined by a depth of thought and breadth and consistency of approach.

HACKELBURY FINE ART LTD 4 LAUNCESTON PLACE, LONDON W8 5RL T: 020 7937 8688 www.hackelbury.co.uk

Beyond the Traditional Publishing Life Cycle

By Christiane Wagner, Editor-in-Chief

To achieve Art Style Magazine’s goal of being part of the best indexers, besides considering a periodicity of at least two years, it is necessary to meet some other requirements. Among the required actions is to have the magazine well-protected and linked to the best repositories. Thus, we are thinking about the future, protecting and promoting the Art Style Magazine’s publications by using Zenodo and Core repositories. We have just done this with our first edition. The whole process is very detailed, but we will soon conclude this important lesson in all Art Style Magazine editions.

With Zenodo, “researchers can receive credit by making the research results citable, through OpenAIRE integrating them into existing reporting lines to funding agencies like the European Commission. Citation information is also passed to DataCite and onto scholarly aggregators.” Art Style Magazine is also deposited in CORE — Open Access for the Humanities and Commons Open Repository Exchange, which is stored in the Columbia University Libraries’ long-term digital preservation storage system.

Art Style Magazine aims to improve how research production quality is evaluated through publications, being a signatory to the main agreements that pursue practices related to research articles published in peer-reviewed journals, which can and should be extended to other products, such as datasets, because they are relevant research results.

Furthermore, the aim is to evaluate the research on its merits. We are also committed to ensuring that our journal will be well-indexed and are working toward this. It is only a matter of time, considering that the best indexing takes, on average, two years. The main indexers and institutions we have subscribed our Art Style Magazine to are as follows: Web of Science, Clarivate Analytics, DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journal), ERIH Plus (European Reference Index for the Humanities and Social Sciences), Google Scholar Metrics, Latindex, and, most importantly, to become a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). COPE is committed to educating and supporting editors, publishers, and those involved in publication ethics to move the publishing culture towards one where ethical practices become a regular part of it. We expect the support and contribution of all those involved and passionate about research and publications, especially in our area. We wish you all the best that Art Style Magazine can offer.

Stay Safe. Stay Well. Stay Tuned for More Coverage of Art and Culture.

We are acting together, staying home and healthy, and trying to be motivated and productive. Let’s stay together and tuned in!

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By Christiane Wagner, Editor-in-Chief

Due to this global health emergency, many of us are working online from home. Art Style Magazine is also working from home, and we think that it is essential to underscore the importance of open access to all educational resources, specifically science, in times of crisis and of the dissemination of reliable, up-to-date scientific information to the public, government officials, humanitarians, health workers, and scientists. In this sense, we seek to stay informed about the best way to keep up with mental health conditions, and it is essential to provide art and culture to everyone who is isolated at home. Therefore, we will be sharing content from cultural institutions with, as always, open access online. We will also provide a session called Let’s stay tuned! that features publications devoted to shorter, creative concept-based pieces pertaining to arts and culture. This session is where collaborators and journalists will be welcome to submit interviews, opinion pieces, reviews of exhibitions and events. 

To put this cause into practice, all interested in collaborating can participate by sending your pieces to our email: editorial@artstyle.international

We will take care of contributions, select essential works, and publish them.

The Art Style Magazine supports open access policies and Creative Commons licenses, cooperating effectively to respond to the unprecedented global health emergency caused by COVID-19.

Finally, we are acting together, staying home and healthy, and trying to be motivated and productive. Let’s stay together and tuned in!

Cinema’s Technical Vanguard, Modern and Contemporary Art

By Christiane Wagner

In retrospect, in this fourth issue of Art Style Magazine,  the bases of the primary aesthetic reflections are focused on modern art and avant-garde movements in their effects, mainly to represent the visually perceived universe of the constructivists, cubists, futurists, dadaists, and surrealists, configuring images through collage, montage, and assemblage to the techniques of film editing. The essay “Montage and Assemblage: an Aesthetic Shock” by Dominique Berthet presents the methods and theories of significant Russian filmmakers in the development of film editing effects and shows how “montage (editing) has transitioned from concept to concept in the film theory of young Soviet filmmakers.” For instance, the French word montage (1917) was appropriated and transformed into a concept–the concept of film editing–that is to say, that it loads of rich theoretical content. Also, he highlighted montage as an aesthetic and political challenge associated with other arts rather than with cinema. Moreover, he stated montage being based on the shock of fragments, themselves linked to artistic modernity, and the assembly of fragments as “the mark of refusal and emancipation vis-à-vis representation, déjà-vu, of the established order.” Finally, toward contemporary art in its “limitless hybridization of artistic practices.”

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Excerpts from Glumov’s Diary is Eisenstein’s first film, 1923. Screenshot by Christiane Wagner. Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed).

“It should be noted that the contradictory debates between Kuleshov, Pudovkin, Vertov, and Eisenstein on the subject of montage must be seen in the context in which they were born – that is, the Soviet Union of 1917-1940. Montage assumes the selection of fragments, their combination (approximation), and the construction of a set” (Berthet 2019).